13 interviews, and over 500 reviews of classical CDs, SACDs, DVDs, Blu-rays, and downloads in this 608-page issue!

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Latest Music Reviews

Born in Budapest in 1956, pianist Laszlo Gardony plays with a rich, two-handed style that can be as rippingly exciting as the eccentric pianism of one...

The sudden, arresting gesture that opens Ed Bennett’s Gothic (2008) sets the scene for this disc. Clearly individual music, the gesture repeats time after time, with...

Recent Music Reviews

This 1990 performance of the Beethoven Ninth, a somewhat belated celebration of the fall of the Berlin Wall, was first commercially released in 1991. This edition,...

For those who may be unfamiliar with Woldemar Bargiel (1828–1897), here’s the lowdown. Clara Schumann (née Wieck), born in 1819, was the offspring of an unhappy...

This wonderfully fluid, relaxed, yet buoyant performance of the Water Music is a throwback to the days of Karl Ristenpart or the young Helmuth Rilling, meaning...

What this extraordinarily engrossing collection of 21 brief piano works is emphatically not is a series of arrangements of Irish folk tunes. Rather, the “Miniatures” consist...

This release gets four gold stars: one for Portland, Maine-born composer James Woodman (b. 1957), one for organist Erik Simmons, one for the Marcussen organ at...

There is a fascinating idea behind this disc: an exploration of how the West has interpreted the East, and the West’s attitudes and misconceptions. The booklet...

The Metropolitan Opera has been smarting from the critical drubbing it endured for the Robert Lepage Ring cycle, introduced in 2010, so it’s gratifying to note...

In over 10 years of preparing annual Want Lists, I can’t think of a year that has been more exasperating than this one. My five allowed...

Szell recorded both of these works more than once, and those recordings are highly regarded. Indeed, collectors particularly value a Concertgebouw Dvořák Eighth Symphony of his....

Gardiner once described Monteverdi as the “Shakespeare of music.” There is something oddly Shakespearean about the vespers, for sure: The chatty vocal exchanges, the grandly ironic...

This 1990 performance of the Beethoven Ninth, a somewhat belated celebration of the fall of the Berlin Wall, was first commercially released in 1991. This edition,...

For those who may be unfamiliar with Woldemar Bargiel (1828–1897), here’s the lowdown. Clara Schumann (née Wieck), born in 1819, was the offspring of an unhappy...

It seems to be a rule: Biographies have to get fatter and fatter. In 1984, Christopher Hogwood took 312 pages to deal with Handel. In 2013,...

When Hyperion reissued its groundbreaking 40-CD series of Schubert’s complete Lieder and part-songs as a boxed set in 2005, considerable regret and even annoyance was expressed...

Born in Budapest in 1956, pianist Laszlo Gardony plays with a rich, two-handed style that can be as rippingly exciting as the eccentric pianism of one...

I’ve listened to several of Turn Left’s “jazz” CDs, and it seems to me that the Norwegians, or at least those Norwegians who record for this...

In his review of Charles Munch and the BSO 1958–1962 —five DVDs of WGBH broadcasts ( Fanfare 38:2)—Huntley Dent reminds us of “Munch’s well-known trait for...

This disc brings together four representative guitar concertos of the past 25 years by Australian composers. Two of the works––the concertos by Richard Charlton (b. 1958)...

Ceora Winds (pronounced “see –OR – a,” apparently) has produced a beautifully life-affirming disc of charming wind music. The charm of Les Tisserandes by Mat Matsumune...

Spelled like this, Phantasy can only mean one thing. In 1906 Walter Willson Cobbett, the wealthy English businessman and amateur violinist, endowed an annual competition for...

The sudden, arresting gesture that opens Ed Bennett’s Gothic (2008) sets the scene for this disc. Clearly individual music, the gesture repeats time after time, with...

This is one of those frustrating discs to review because it cannot be easily summarized. On the plus side, the repertoire is an imaginative and engaging...

Promessa (promise) is the title of a new CD from Oehms featuring German soprano Sophia Brommer. Promise it has and promise it delivers. She has an...

Mika Nisula (b. 1978) is a young Finnish tenor who made these recordings in 2008, when he had just turned 30. Some of them are what...

An “akafist” (more commonly spelled “akathist”), from which the choir performing here takes its name, is an Eastern Orthodox hymn dedicated to either a saint, a...

I don’t recall any disc containing six settings of the same text, in this case the Medieval sequence Stabat mater . I once wrote an article...

According to the liner notes, this album grew out of a research project by music historian Birgit Lodes, entitled “Musical Life in the Late Middle Ages...

This is an intricate, exquisite, and lucid CD, full of careful engagement with the knotty Latin texts, and strung together with highly nuanced vocal detail. Alexander...


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