Issue 38:1
Sept/Oct 2014
Magazine Contents

Classical Recordings Pg. 5

A 40-something pianist/composer with an academic background in mathematics and physics and a doctorate in Technology and the Arts, as well as a 2013 recipient of...

Any new recording of music by Ben Johnston is an event. By now, I’ve reviewed enough of his music in this pages that readers may know...

What sets this Josquin’s Missa Ave maris stella apart from others on disc isn’t its use of two voices per part, which is fairly standard in...

Stratton Bull has proved a worthy successor to Rebecca Stewart, the founder of this vocal ensemble based in the Netherlands. His first disc was unique, not...

Back in 1991, when I was still scouring Europe and even the former Soviet Union for vinyl objects for my insatiable record customers, I happened across...

Barthold Heinrich Brockes was the son of a very wealthy Hamburg merchant and extremely active politically, financially, and culturally in his city. He was a member...

This is an embarrassing way to begin a review, but I’m honestly not sure whether this is Yoon-Hee Kim’s debut album, or if one of the...

Chances are that few people have heard of Heinrich Justinius Knecht (1752–1817), but I will bet that there are even fewer who have never heard of...

It’s funny how in the record industry things often come to pass almost as soon as they’re spoken. In a glowing review of the Alexander String...

Jack Liebeck and Katya Apekisheva’s recital of pieces written or transcribed by Fritz Kreisler opens with the one often cited as Kreisler’s best, the Praeludium and...

For years American composer David Lang (b. 1957) was primarily known as one of the three founders of the post-Minimalist Bang on a Can collective (along...

The readings of Jean-Marie Leclair’s sonatas for two violins (op. 3 and op. 12) by Greg Ewer (1738 Lorenzo Guadagnini) and Adam Lamotte (1730 Bernardo Calcagni)...

I’ve written before about the American composer Arthur Levering (b. 1953). (Disclosure: Over the years he’s become a friend, though the relationship developed after my initial...

This disc, titled Elation, presents the music of three contemporary composers—Scott Lindroth, Stephen Jaffe, and Miriam Gideon—as played by a group of wind and string instruments,...

This conspectus of Liszt’s “twilight” works, composed between 1880 and the composer’s death in 1886, has the advantage of savvy selection. For instance, Krausz gives us...

Alvin Lucier (b. 1931) has endured long enough to see the world (or at least a good part of it) come around to his way of...

Poland really knows how to celebrate its composers. Anniversary celebrations, for everybody from Chopin to Panufnik, are typically marked with concerts of their music around the...

The current release, focusing on the concertante works of the Polish Modernist composer Witold Lutosławski, is the sixth volume of a projected cycle of his complete...

There are many pleasures on this new Mahler recital disc, not the least of which is the elegant musicianship and refined subtlety of the interpretations of...

As I have previously provided fairly comprehensive discussions of Bruno Walter’s surviving performances of both Das Lied von der Erde (in 37:4) and the Symphony No....

I’ve said many times—and I stand by it—that Mahler’s symphonies are not like anyone else’s, in the sense that they can withstand almost every sort of...

Now that Mahler vies with Beethoven as the most popular composer on concert programs, his genius deepens with each generation. Despite being shrugged off after his...

Mahler’s Seventh is probably the least popular and most difficult of his symphonies, but it still has 80 recordings listed by ArkivMusic, including from conductors such...

Back in 36:4 I reviewed a Brilliant Classics set of Francesco Mancini’s 12 concertos for recorder, which—as I noted in that review—are not to be confused...

Tigran Mansurian (b. 1935) is arguably Armernia’s most renowned composer. He certainly has hit the jackpot as one of Manfred Eicher’s “adopted” composers, which gives him...

Let’s get this out of the way first. Consensus opinion as to why Joseph Marx (1882–1964) is little remembered today relies heavily on his loyalty to...

After listening to much of Maxwell Davies’s “regular” music, the suite from The Boyfriend, written for the Ken Russell movie, certainly sounds a bit strange to...

Young (19-year-old) American violinist Chad Hoopes has paired Felix Mendelssohn’s and John Adams’s violin concertos in his debut recording. He played a 1713 Stradivari for the...

These are not the same 1955 Mendelssohn and 1954 Brahms concertos by Johanna Martzy issued on Testament 1037 and reviewed by David Nelson in 18:1. Those...

The Maggini Quartet is an outstanding exponent of the British repertoire, but has hardly neglected the core, in concert at least. This is the inaugural volume...

It has been about 45 years now since Mendelssohn’s once popular but forgotten “Lobgesang” Symphony was first revived on disc by Herbert von Karajan and Wolfgang...

This disc’s actual title is Ballet Music from the Operas . The music is a souvenir of the era (roughly, the middle part of the 19th...

Ludwig Minkus’s Don Quixote has held a place in the repertoire since its premiere at the Bolshoi Theater in 1869. The music is charming and well...

Volume 15 of Hyperion’s series devoted to The Romantic Violin Concerto comprises Emil Młynarski’s two violin concertos and two shorter works by Aleksander Zarzycki. The program...

Vernon Handley, a conductor whose service to British music should be praised in the same breath as that of Adrian Boult (but too seldom was in...

This is Vol. 1 of a projected series of CDs covering the complete songs of Frederic Mompou. Having already reviewed this composer’s piano music, I was...

Catalonian composer Frederic Mompou may not be a household name, but in his native Spain he is considered the dean on Spanish composers. He utilized Catalonian...

This disc pairs a commissioned work by Meredith Monk, one of the few pieces she did not write for her own vocal ensemble first, with a...

The Western Wind Vocal Ensemble, founded in 1969, turned 45 this year. It commissioned the two works on this CD, and they are receiving their first...

Meredith Monk (b. 1942) is one of our great cultural treasures. Few artists have genuinely mastered so many aspects of what today is blithely called “performance”—music,...

The year was 1782, and Mozart’s star was on the rise in Vienna, a city he had recently come to call home after being (literally) booted...

Before looking at the specifics of this disc, I would like to take a brief soapbox opportunity to reflect upon what seems to be a trend...

The mature Mozart piano concertos are, for me, the eternal apex of the format. From the Concerto No. 9 to the glorious final 27th, no two...

I was surprised to discover that Neville Marriner is not only still with us (he turned 90 just 11 days before I reviewed this CD, although...

My first thought on receiving this disc was that it had to be a reissue, since Neville Marriner turned 90 in 2014 and hasn’t led the...

It hasn’t been that long ( Fanfare 37:4, actually) since I reviewed an earlier disc in this series, one containing the 20th and 27th concertos. I...

These are elegant and intelligent performances that bear repetition very well, in spite of some idiosyncrasies. I might as well address the idiosyncrasies first. In the...

The Beethoven Concerto is likely to be more universally applauded than the Mozart, but I enjoyed both immensely and believe there is much to reward the...