Issue 38:3
Jan/Feb 2015
Magazine Contents

Classical Recordings Pg. 3

Ewa Pobłocka is a most distinguished artist. My first encounter with her was her 1991 recording of Andrzej Panufnik’s Piano Concerto, conducted by the composer. Her...

It’s virtually a reviewer’s cliché to say that a composer such as Muzio Clementi hasn’t received his due. It seems to me he has. Some of...

Clementi, anyone? There haven’t been many takers in the concert hall recently. But the ghost of a neglected composer can cherish the memory of being revived...

Dinos Constantinides (b. 1929 in Greece) is music director of the Louisiana Sinfonietta. For 22 years he directed a festival of contemporary music at Louisiana State...

Several discs of the music of Dinos Constantinides have brought forth positive critical comment from the present writer: This one is no exception. The Fist Violin...

Naxos here licenses and reissues a disc that originally appeared on a different label—in this case, a 2005 release by the British Music Society, also reissued...

This is a lovely disc of sacred choral music. Carson Cooman is an American composer (b. 1982), church and concert organist, and a scholar and writer...

Heretofore, my exposure to Carson Cooman’s music has been to his organ and chamber music, of which I’ve positively reviewed several CDs. Consequently, I was glad...

I had my suspicions, when Zig-Zag released a 7-CD retrospective late in 2012 of recordings by both Amandine Beyer (Gli Incogniti) and Chiari Banchini (Ensemble 415),...

Eric Craven has spent most of his life as a schoolteacher, in the fields of math and music, in his hometown of Manchester, England. It turns...

This is the second CD on this label devoted to the piano music of the somewhat reclusive English composer Eric Craven. As the booklet reveals, Craven...

Composer Eric Craven, whose roots are in jazz as well as classical music, uses unusual styles of non-prescriptive notation. In “Low Order Non-Prescriptive” notation (LoNP) only...

Those of us who love the symphonies of Paul Creston and feel that he is one of the more unfairly neglected mid-20th-century American composers will welcome...

Who would have anticipated that a deeply English label such as Dutton would be the first to issue a collection of four premiere recordings devoted to...

My admiration for Michael Korstick continues to grow with this, Vol. III of Debussy’s music. Following on the heels of Vol. II, which included the

Although these performances were recorded in, respectively, 2009, 2013, and 2004, there is no significant difference in the sound, the clarity and warmth of which doesn’t...

This pairing of the first quartets of Brahms and his protégé Ernő Dohnányi looks better on paper than it works in the actual event. First, Brahms’s...

“Entirely without merit” said a contemporary review, and the performance here does not completely discourage this. However it is not all bad, and for fans of...

My first encounter with the Zemlinsky Quartet’s ongoing recordings of Dvořák’s cycle came in 38:1. Previous reviews by others have appeared in 31:1, 36:3, and 37:4....

The title of this CD is The Cello Works which, to some, might suggest Dvořák’s complete cello works. However, the early Cello Concerto in A is...

This CD is a delight from beginning to end and goes to the top of my Dvořák Sixth list, worthy of standing beside Bělohlávek’s warm and...

Lodia’s Carlos Païta edition continues apace with this splendid recording of the Dvořák Seventh, a recording that, when it was originally issued in the early 1980s,...

When Barbirolli and Boult were at their height, I don’t remember anyone complaining that Elgar’s symphonies hadn’t spread very far outside the British Isles. This may...

It wasn’t that long ago—in Fanfare 36:1, to be exact—that I reviewed a 1976 in-concert recording from the Royal Albert Hall of Elgar’s Symphony No. 1...

Fans of Derek and Clive, the alter egos of Dudley Moore and Peter Cook, will remember a devastatingly funny track from their Come Again album in...

What a stunningly beautiful performance this is! The Elgar First Symphony and I go back a long way together, though I wish it were longer still....

George Enescu (1881–1955) was one of the greatest musical talents to emerge around the turn of the last century, along with Sergei Rachmaninoff and Ernő Dohnányi....

In addition to a fairly extensive, published oeuvre , George Enescu left behind a large collection of incomplete works. Much of it dates from his student...

George Enescu’s considerable output is still largely neglected in the concert hall and underrepresented on disc. This recording of the composer’s A-Minor Piano Trio is only...

I asked to review this release because it looked like something that would interest me—duo sonatas for violin and piano and one for cello and piano...

About a year ago, I stumbled across a 10-inch LP from Hungary containing a work by Ferenc Farkas (1905–2000) for cello and string orchestra titled

Ottorino Respighi was by all accounts a generous man and a genial, effective teacher. He taught his students technical proficiency in composition, rather than trying to...

Fasch was well regarded in his lifetime, but his star faded rapidly after his death. The galant style swept away nearly all interest in Baroque music;...

Featured on this disc are two examples of Fauré’s restrained though potent late style: Mirages, a cycle of four songs from 1919, set to enigmatic, vaguely...

If the above headnote, with all of its superscripts, seems confusing, that’s because it is. All of these works by Fauré, with the exception of his...

Is the Fauré Requiem becoming the new Mozart Requiem? Not in content or style, obviously, but in number of reconstructions. This latest version, by Marc Rigaudière,...

This is the first recording of a new edition of the Requiem by Marc Rigaudière, “a reconstruction of the first complete liturgical performance” of the work....

This is a new venture for this ensemble, the first disc to be recorded on the Orchestra of St John’s own label. It’s gotten off to...

These warhorses slough off over-familiarity to take on renewed attractiveness in the flair, verve, and sweep animating Lovett and Guzzo’s grasp. Their impassioned, rhapsodic readings often...

In Jean-Michel Nectoux’s Gabriel Fauré: a musical life (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1991), two paragraphs are given to the Vocalise-Étude , composed for Conservatoire sight-singing examinations...

Of the myriad of Italian Baroque keyboardists, one has probably heard of fewer than a handful, principally Girolamo Frescobaldi, whose works were widespread and much appreciated...

Michael Finnissy’s works, ostensibly for violin and piano, also employ instruments as varied as detuned harpsichord on this side of normal and household appliances on the...

Tom Flaherty looks perhaps more like an astrophysicist than a composer, and the album’s title, Looking for Answers , might also suggest a scientific pursuit, but...

On this well-filled album, composer and cellist Tom Flaherty has gathered up six chamber works written over a seven-year period that showcase not just his cello...

This extremely appealing disc is the first devoted to the music of South African composer Robert Fokkens (b. 1975). Educated at the University of Cape Town...

“Within the last two years I have submitted four works to the BBC,” wrote John Foulds in 1933 to Adrian Boult, then music director of the...

Last year, in Fanfare 37:1, I reviewed an album of lute music by Francesco Canova—also referred to as Francesco da Milano, or simply “Il Divino”—performed by...

Franck’s perennial Violin Sonata in A is more soulfully fitted to the instrument than any other violin sonata I can think of. (See in your mind’s...