Issue 39:1
Sept/Oct 2015
Magazine Contents

Classical Recordings Pg. 6

The CDs and videos commemorating Claudio Abbado’s passing multiply by the month, but this televised concert from Tokyo must be one of the best. I found...

These readings of Charles Mackerras were recorded by the Vanguard label in 1973, and originally issued on two separate LPs (VSD 71188 and 71177). The

Johann Gottfried Müthel (1728–1788) maintains an extremely tenuous toehold as a footnote in musical history by virtue of being the last pupil of J. S. Bach....

Recorded in concert at the Barbican Centre between 2009 and 2011, this set, if purchased in physical media format, contains Nielsen’s six symphonies spread over three...

These brisk, energetic performances of Nielsen’s First and Third symphonies feature the now middle-aged Finnish conductor Sakari Oramo with the Royal Stockholm Orchestra. Like many modern...

For all its lively energy, there is a winning serenity here that I find time and again in the conducting of Sakari Oramo. This is stunningly...

As the successor to Simon Rattle in Birmingham, the admired Finnish conductor Sakari Oramo had impossible shoes to fill. He stayed for a respectable decade, from...

Raymond Tuttle was enthusiastic about Oramo’s performances of Nielsen’s Fourth and Fifth, and many of the same virtues are found on this next installment in his...

I gave a lukewarm review to Oramo’s equally lukewarm performances of Nielsen’s First and Third symphonies (BIS 2048) in an earlier issue, but discovered to my...

I couldn’t be more delighted with this SACD. The Nielsen Second Symphony and I go way back to the original Turnabout LP first released in the...

This is long overdue. The neglect shown the generation of 19th-century American Romantics in general and John Knowles Paine (1839–1906) in particular is truly shameful. The...

I’ve never been one for second-line 19th-century composers, nor have I been much taken with American music before Ives, but John Knowles Paine (1839–1906) has always...

Born in St. Petersburg in 1884 to a Dutch father and Danish mother, Leopold van der Pals left Russia early in the last century to study...

This is the second volume of William Perry’s Music for Great Films of the Silent Era . (The first was reviewed in Fanfare 35:3 by William...

I have found much to enjoy in the music of William Perry: In Fanfare 31:3 there was the Trumpet Concerto, then in Fanfare 32:1 a disc...

This is actually the second disc of music by Russian composer Nikolai Ivanovich Peyko (1916–1995) from the enterprising Toccata Classics label, although at the time of...

I enjoyed a recent Hyperion disc of Hans Pfitzner’s cello concertos, so this new disc looked interesting––at least, on paper. In reality, it is a disappointment....

This is a neat collection of choral works that Poulenc composed from 1936, the year in which he made a return to choral music and religion...

This CD covers Poulenc’s complete music for winds and piano excepting the early, and quite silly, Sonata for Two Clarinets. The Iowa Ensemble is a pretty...

Begun in 1933 at the suggestion of his fellow Russian émigré Gregor Piatigorsky, Prokofiev’s only so-named cello concerto has been a very tough sell after its...

Born in Ukraine, Mark Taratushkin graduated from the Moscow Conservatory in 2013. He subsequently emigrated to Germany and has continued his studies there. He currently resides...

This is a rare document of Eugene Ormandy as a guest conductor. He was so singly devoted to his Philadelphia Orchestra, not only serving as music...

Andrew Litton and the Bergen Philharmonic continue their impressive Prokofiev series with a powerhouse Firth Symphony. Though I am familiar with the Litton/Bergen readings of the...

This CD has a lot going for it. The Bergen Philharmonic is a virtuosic, richly sprung orchestra of considerable tonal weight and accomplishment. In recent years,...

When I was growing up and getting my feet wet in complete opera recordings, there were three Bohème recordings that were pushed rather hard: the Moffo-Tucker...

Like most musicians of his time, Henry Purcell worked to entertain the aristocracy. It was the only likely way to make a decent living from his...

“Since I am endeavoring to train a skilled and intelligent musician, and not just a mechanical flute player, I must try not only to educate his...

I listened to Anna Fedorova’s recording of the Rachmaninoff Second Concerto right after finishing my review of Stewart Goodyear’s version of the Second and Third—and, what...

Steinway & Sons presents the much promoted Stewart Goodyear here in his second concerto CD; his recording of concertos by Tchaikovsky and Grieg was reviewed by...

Tenor Yuri Gorodetski was born in Mogilev, Belarus in 1983. A graduate of the Belarusian State Conservatory, he also studied in Italy with Raina Kabaivanska and...

Opera under Lully’s reign was in one important sense all about court propaganda for the Sun King. Once he died, that purpose was lost, and the...

Here’s a fascinating work for baritone and string quartet roughly along the lines of Samuel Barber’s Dover Beach , replacing lofty Victorian verse with passages from...

Daphnis et Chloé is Ravel’s most ambitious orchestral work, longer in duration—close to an hour—and calling for a larger and more diverse ensemble than he’d ever...

When Ravel took the entire third act of Daphnis and Chloé and retitled it as Suite No. 2, he redeemed the score with a stroke of...

Yannick Nézet-Séguin has taken Philadelphia’s classical music world by storm. His charismatic personality instantly connects with audiences, and it is clear that the orchestra consistently plays...

These 1974–75 recordings of Ravel’s piano works, originally issued on LP by Denon, are here digitally remastered for this CD release. This set has received mixed...

This set of Ravel’s complete Mélodies enters a surprisingly well covered field. There are already available three other more or less complete collections, which vary slightly...

Despite the continuing popularity of Ravel’s orchestral music—his Piano Concerto for the Left Hand or the infamous Boléro —many of his songs remain not very well...

The gorgeous sound of the Vienna Philharmonic, like that of its compeers in Amsterdam, depends heavily on the acoustic qualities of its home base. Beyond the...

King Lear would seem the quintessential match of Shakespeare with Verdi or Mussorgsky, but it didn’t happen, so Aribert Reimann—urged on by Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau—tackled the play...

When people discuss Franz Xaver Richter (1709–1789), the usual fall-back position is to Charles Burney’s rather uncharitable description in his journey diaries that the composer’s music...

Ferdinand Ries (1784–1838) is most famous for being a friend of and erstwhile factotum for Beethoven, who gave him piano lessons starting in 1803. He also...

The casual listener could be forgiven for not knowing, at times, whether this was a new or an ancient work. (It was composed in 2009.) However,...

Although written in 2009, Wolfgang Rihm has deliberately invoked in Et Lux a timeless, floating quality to this piece that makes it, on blind listening, decidedly...

Beneath the stunning cover photo of the Palacio Real de Aranjuez—begun by Philip II as the official residence of the King of Spain—lies a singularly drab...

Not To
Be Missed!