Issue 38:6
July/Aug 2015
Magazine Contents

Classical Recordings Pg. 6

Writing in 1875, a Russian critic observed that Tchaikovsky’s First Piano Concerto, “like a first pancake, was a flop.” Firsts, of course, whether concertos, symphonies, or...

Charming doesn’t spring to mind when reviewing Rachmaninoff’s piano music, but the young French pianist Fanny Azzuro delivers a reading of the Corelli Variations that is...

Blessed with real fire and intelligence, and with a technique to match, French pianist Fanny Azzuro (a name new to me, I confess) is clearly a...

The major work here is the 40-minute symphony by Karol Rathaus, an important discovery. There is a more than adequate CPO stereo recording of the work...

This recording contains music by three composers who had connections with conductor Jascha Horenstein. The program notes describe an interesting anecdote where Horenstein and some of...

This is one of those rare recordings that came my way for review as a surprise rather than as a request, but I was eager to...

I recently had the opportunity of attending the Rotterdam Philharmonic live in San Francisco. Yannick Nézet-Séguin led Ravel’s Mother Goose Suite on the program, and I...

I couldn’t find an online bio for baritone Philippe Cantor, but the booklet informs us that he began his career as an early music singer with...

The Puertas Quartet was formed in 2009 by two married couples, English violinists Tom Norris and Ellie Fagg, who alternate between first and second, and violist...

The phenomenal violinist Maria Bachmann and Trio Solisti, which includes cellist Alexis Pia Gerlach and pianist Adam Neiman, weave their magic in this superb pairing of...

What an awkward no man’s land Licinio Refice’s career occupied. Born in 1883, so very much in the subsequent generation to the likes of Puccini and...

Not that long ago, we had the pleasure of reviewing former Fanfare reviewer Susan Kagan’s survey of Ferdinand Ries’s piano sonatas. The pleasure, to be perfectly...

Expanding her activities on behalf of Ferdinand Ries, Susan Kagan has moved to that composer’s chamber repertoire, making a start with three of Ries’s 18 violin...

Two previous volumes of Friedemann Eichhorn’s survey of Rode’s violin concertos on Naxos were reviewed in 32:6 (Nos. 7, 10, and 13) and 35:4 (Nos. 3,...

In the middle of the 18th century, Rolle was supposedly Germany’s favorite composer. By 1825, though, he had been eclipsed, and now remains highly obscure. He...

This is a welcome release on several counts. First and foremost, it brings to the fore one of the most inquisitive musical minds that we know...

Following on the heels of his wife’s splendid recording of Johan Roman’s harpsichord works, recorder player Dan Laurin here embarks on his sonatas for that instrument—as...

The spin of the operatic wheel stopped, for Gioacchino Rossini, in 1829 with this opera. Only 37 years old at the time, he had amassed such...

Rossini’s Petite messe solennelle was premiered in Paris on March 14, 1864, for the consecration of the private chapel of the work’s dedicatee, Countess Louise Pillet-Will....

Now here is something exciting: a Requiem, and mercifully not Mozart’s. Rubino, learned head of Palermo Cathedral (1643–1668), is completely arresting here. The genre is odd,...

Score another coup for CPO for disentombing Ernst Rudorff (1840–1916), and score one for me for finally getting to review the work of a composer so...

Among the more enervating and original compositions for piano composed in the late 20th century is Frederick Rzewski’s The People United Will Never Be Defeated!

In a 36:3 review I wrote of an Anima Records release containing Saint-Saëns’s B♭-Major Piano Quartet, op. 41, I identified it in the headnote as Piano...

Of Saint-Saëns’s five symphonies—two early efforts are unnumbered—only the last of them, the No. 3 in C Minor, has gained much currency on record or in...

It is good to see the early symphonies of the “French Beethoven” at last getting their due on modern CD. I put the notion in quotes,...

The Horszowski Trio takes its name from the famous pianist Mieczysław Horszowski, of whom pianist Rieko Aizawa was his last pupil. Of the other two members,...

Saint-Saeës’s two piano trios bracket his career, and are well represented on recordings. The ingratiating First, from 1864, hovers at the edge of the standard trio...

Camille Saint-Saëns was a man who loved his little jokes. Once, when asked at a public gathering his real opinion of his arch-enemy Vincent d’Indy, he...

Paul Salerni was introduced to Fanfare readers by my colleague Henry Fogel in his interview in 34:4. The work reviewed in conjunction with that interview was...

What a pleasure it is to encounter a disk of chamber music, composed between 2002 and 2012, that is so filled with wit, melodic invention, genuine...

This collection of chamber works by the Finnish composer Aulis Sallinen contains two of his recent compositions: the Sonata for Cello and Piano, op. 86, of...

The title of this album is African Math, and “symbolizes” (more on that in a moment) composer Martin Scherzinger’s desire to “Africanize” standard Western instruments to...

The Schnittke and Schubert piano sonatas on this disc come from two different worlds, but they are united by a word that Vladimir Feltsman applies to...

With good reason Alfred Schnittke described himself as “a Russian composer without a drop of Russian blood.” Both his parents were German, either emigrating east or...

Since it was composed to honor the opening of the new Gewandhaus in Leipzig in 1981, it’s appropriate that Schnittke’s monumental Third—calling for 111 performers and...

Vladimir Jurowski may be the ideal conductor for Schnittke’s Third Symphony. It is the music of a Russian composer, but of German descent, exploring German music...

In 2000, Naxos published an album with the marvelously optimistic title Japanese Orchestral Favorites . As it happened, it was a terrific collection, not least for...

Schubert undertook a long, winding journey to compose piano sonatas that might equal Beethoven’s, and his ascent to success forms the arc of a story. No...

This is the third volume in the Diogenes Quartet’s Schubert cycle, and it gets more interesting as it unfolds. When it’s complete, this survey promises to...

Carefully produced, recorded at the Snape Maltings (January 20–22, 2014), extensively annotated, and beautifully packaged, one wants to welcome this CD and to recommend it to...

A previous Schubert album in 2009 from the superb French pianist David Fray cemented his reputation for being a sensitive, original interpreter of the beloved composer....

This double CD, consisting of the original piano version of Schubert’s Winterreise for high voice together with Daniel Behle’s arrangement of the cycle for piano and...

Enterprising label CPO here continues its exploration of the music of Georg Alfred Schumann (1866–1952), whom we last encountered in 36:5 in a recording of his...

For opera singers the escalator ride to stardom is steep, and it lets many off on lower floors. For a singer with an inclination toward Lieder,...

The December Nights Festival in Moscow was 34 years old last year, and it’s centered around the memory of Sviatoslav Richter, if no longer around his...

My overall assessment of this recording is highly favorable, but it has three significant shortcomings that I would like to address at the beginning of this...

The pianist Alicja Fiderkiewicz was born in Warsaw. She began her studies at the age of three, before being accepted into the Karol Szymanowski School of...

No, no, no. I must resist the temptation to review the packaging and stick to the contents, but I guess it’s the credits to the dressmaker...

It won’t make headlines in Berlin that a rising Lieder singer, especially of the common baritone species, has a genuine gift, showing the greatest promise perhaps...

Schumann’s Third and Shostakovich’s Second are the most-performed of their piano trios, and most discussion about them is biographical. However, Schumann’s, from 1851, strikes me as...

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Be Missed!