Issue 38:2
Nov/Dec 2014
Magazine Contents

Classical Recordings

In Fanfare 34:5 Scott Noriega wrote a less-than-glowing review of Furuhata-Kersting’s first disc, observing a lack of charm and humor, which were essential qualities for the...

This is a rather unusual set, and I don’t think many Fanfare readers would give much consideration to a Beethoven box recorded in the former Soviet...

This is a very well played “Eroica.” Strings are pure and fine, winds are well tuned, every note is clear and elegant. Balances are ideal, tempo...

These two performances were recorded in New York’s Liederkranz Hall during the first and second weeks of 1930. They were the final recordings Willem Mengelberg would...

This continues Pristine Audio’s reissue of British Columbia’s complete Beethoven symphony series, the first to be issued on electrical recordings. To get down to basics, although...

When Herbert von Karajan recorded The Rite of Spring in 1963, the sharp-tongued Stravinsky delivered a famous cut: “Karajan is not out of his depth so...

Beethoven’s piano trios have been receiving considerable coverage of late in performances ranging from the historical and sublime—an “Archduke” by the Trio Trieste—and the seriously hideous—an...

Frank Peter Zimmermann, violin; Antoine Tamestit, viola; and Christian Poltéra, cello came together to form the Trio Zimmermann in 2007. The disc at hand completes the...

The title of the CD is Lazy Afternoon: Salon Music for Classical Saxophone . The classical saxophonist in question is Javier Oviedo, whom I praised fulsomely—perhaps...

Australian-born Arthur Benjamin (1893–1960) spent most of his adult life in London. He taught piano at the Royal College of Music, where Benjamin Britten and Alun...

I last heard this recording in the Spring of 1953 on 78s. At the time, perhaps impressed by its vitality, I thought highly of it, but...

When Brooks Atkinson reviewed the original West Side Story for the New York Times in 1957, he called it “as ugly as the city jungles.” This...

This recording is taken from the first-ever concert version of Leonard Bernstein’s West Side Story . Michael Tilson Thomas conducts the essentially complete score (a couple...

West Side Story is so familiar that it’s easy to take its genius for granted. But as I’ve said before, whether you look to the opera...

We are often told that Michael Tilson Thomas is the closest link we have to Leonard Bernstein today. I won’t disagree, but he is not Bernstein....

The anticipation of this recording almost reached a fever pitch in the months leading up to its release. A new West Side Story —complete—featuring a highly...

There seems to have been a bit of a revival of the music of violinist Antonio Bertali (1605–1669), who spent the last 20 years of his...

The last generation of musicians has promoted Biber’s Mystery (Rosary) Sonatas from the ranks of curiosities to full-blown canonicity; and despite the difficulties of performing them...

It has to be said that this album may not be getting a fair trial with me, uninitiated as I am to the world of the...

“Music is, in part, social relationships made audible: I organize those networks and occasions. Then the resulting community has something to listen to: itself in a...

Without making too much of an ado of it, what a qualitative gap there is between the music of Ernest Bloch and that of Lars-Erik Larsson,...

Both Martin Anderson and Walter Simmons wrote superbly detailed reviews of the original ASV issue of this release back in 21:5, and it would be foolhardy...

Some operatic careers are puzzling to those of us who do the observing rather than the singing or hiring, and certainly one of the most puzzling...

York Bowen would seem to be enjoying a crest in popularity, if the number of new releases dedicated to his music over the last several years...

This came completely out of left field—not, mind you, for finding Yuzuko Horigome and Viviane Spanoghe together once again in a shared Brahms enterprise. Not that...

In Fanfare 21:1 I reviewed Christopher Spering’s recording of this version of A German Requiem that Brahms himself made for a London performance in 1871. I...

It is always stimulating to have one’s expectations run smack into a different reality, and that is the case with this splendid recording. The Dresdner Kreuzchor...

When the young and rather dashing Brahms first showed up on the Schumanns’ doorstep and swept them off their feet, his calling card as a composer...

Let me begin by saying that a few years before I joined the Fanfare family, I acquired a number of Amati CDs featuring the Rodin Quartet...

The third and fourth movements of Brahms’s F-Minor Piano Quintet must surely contain some of the wildest music the composer ever wrote. The question is, can...

Two renowned 19th-century composers, Chopin and Grieg, neither of whom seemed to show much interest in chamber music, both surprised us with one cello sonata each....

These readings of Brahms’s cello sonatas, recorded in 1998, are highly competent without being in any way exceptional. Cellist Whitfield plays sensitively enough, but doesn’t match...

It seems that new versions of these Brahms perennial favorites have been arriving lately with predictable frequency, and not a few of them have exhibited such...

As a window into Toscanini’s fire-hot Brahms, this can hardly be bettered. The sound, though, as one might expect from 1935, can be extremely harsh (there...

The ostensible theme of this album is its title, Sacrifices . Mercifully, that isn’t mentioned in the liner notes, as it only holds true for two...

A Bruckner Mass is the last thing I’d have expected from Robin Ticciati, whose recording activities to date have ranged from Berlioz’s Symphonie fantastique and

For $64,000, and no help from the studio audience: Which famous symphony portrays dawn in a medieval city, a procession of knights into the forest, a...

First, some discographic clarification. Nagano recorded these symphonies during his seven-year tenure with the Bavarian State Orchestra. The Fourth, set down in Farao’s studios in 2007,...

Every so often in the conducting world, as circumstances permit, a new “grand old man” of German music pops to the surface. Self-effacing, ignored for years...

After his superlative Mahler Fifth, which was full of originality, I looked forward to hearing what Iván Fischer could do with the Bruckner Seventh, where the...

Greetings! I’m the new boy on the Fanfare Bruckner block, but I learned the Seventh Symphony from college library 78s, and I well remember turning over...

Kent Nagano makes a very strong case for the 1890 version of Bruckner’s Eighth Symphony—by making a hash of the 1887 original. Going back to original...

After reviewing two disappointing Bruckner Eighths for this issue, I was not looking forward to this one. But Mario Venzago proves (for the hundredth time?) that...

This one of those wonderful but frustrating DVDs, with otherwise fine sound and good notes, which fails to tell you exactly where it comes from and...

I’ve been interested in Gaetano Brunetti’s music ever since Nonesuch released an LP back in the 1970s of his Symphony No. 23, as performed by Newell...

The title of this album, Sonatas with Cornett , is a misnomer—most importantly, because five of the nine pieces are for solo organ. Which isn’t to...

It hardly needs saying that the ego-driven world of opera is frequently beset with controversy, and seemingly it was so since the first operas were presented...