Issue 38:3
Jan/Feb 2015
Magazine Contents

Classical Recordings Pg. 4

Three of the five works on this disc—those by Hans Gál—are declared to be world premiere recordings. Only the two Krenek sonatas have been previously recorded;...

Some composers who fled the Nazis were never able to reclaim their prestigious reputations in their new homes. Hans Gál had received important prizes in his...

I’ve already had plenty to say about this magnificent performance in Fanfare 37:3 and 37:6, as well as in the Want List in 38:2. Suffice it...

Daniel Goode is a composer with a kind of iconoclast bent that has left him out of the mainstream of modern American music. For some time,...

Daniel Goode (born New York in 1936) is a composer and clarinetist who has studied with, among others, Henry Cowell, Otto Luening, and Pauline Oliveros. Goode...

If you go to the Fanfare Archive and search for reviews of music by Théodore Gouvy (1819–1898) you will discover that I have joined a long...

Except in some of her former colonies—which, alas, doesn’t really include the United States—the brass band is an almost wholly British obsession. Given its modern impetus...

André-Modeste Grétry is one of those historically significant composers who has not quite reached the depths of oblivion, but exposure to several of his works (...

Some composers include unusual sounds or unusual means of sound production in their works out of mere curiosity, or for the sake of novelty. For Sofia...

Louis-Gabriel Guillemain (1705–1770) was one of those composers who achieved great fame and success in his lifetime, only to shrink rapidly to the size of a...

Christopher Gunning (b. 1944) is an English composer who studied with Edmund Rubbra and Richard Rodney Bennett. He is known for orchestral symphonies and concertos, but...

Pavel Haas’s Second String Quartet is a marvelous piece—not because of its funky title, nor for its percussion in the finale which limits its appearances on...

I first saw British mezzo-soprano Alice Coote perform, as I expect did many Americans, when she sang Hänsel in Humperdinck’s fairy tale opera in a Live...

I’ve reviewed Alice Coote twice before. Her Nerone in L’Incoronazione di Poppea (Decca 074 3339; Fanfare 33:3) was a “thoroughly believable monster of selfishness … with...

All right, so George Frédéric Handel did not write any piano concertos, and all of the works on this disc were originally for organ, but pianist...

Recorded between March 1989 and July 1990 and released the following year, Christopher Hogwood’s recording of Orlando returns in stripped-down form. Originally on three CDs, it’s...

The title of this disc is taken from the aria “Son d’amore” from George Frédéric Handel’s 1726 opera seria Alessandro, but the subtitle, “Sonate per flauto...

There seems to be a surge of interest in the past few years in the solid, conservative music of mid-century America. And why not? It is...

Alexander Schneider (1908–1993) was a unique force in American chamber music. He was not only a fine technician and a vital musician in his own right,...

I see by the trusty Fanfare Archive that the Tinalley String Quartet has been reviewed before, twice, in fact, by Michael Cameron and Steven Ritter, both...

It was only just one issue ago (in 38:1) that I reviewed Tacet’s repackaging of its Haydn string quartet cycle with the Auryn Quartet on Blu-ray...

Perhaps the most unusual facet of this debut recital, which is played on a 1799 Stein pianoforte, is that Bobby Mitchell improvises transitions between sonatas, modulating...

These live performances took place in London’s Barbican, as follows: Symphony No. 92 in G: October 2 and 4, 2011 Symphony No. 93 in D: December...

Thomas Fey, the good-cop, bad-cop of Haydn symphonies, is at it again, in spades. After his deep, soulful Adagio introduction to Symphony No. 98, filled with...

Haydn uses the term “divertimenti” here as an umbrella term for three suites of between three and six movements, all cast as trio sonatas with bass...

This is an interesting reissue of two Classico CDs from Denmark. CD 1 is a full hour of Christensen with the Con Fuoco vocal ensemble and...

As they did some years back with Shostakovich’s Age of Gold , Naxos has put us in its debt once again with a complete recording of...

Jitka Hosprová has been a leading Czech violist for over a decade and has played solo recitals in many of the world’s major music centers. It’s...

Huck Hodge (b. 1977) writes music that is shaped by three currents: a fascination with “extra-musical” stimuli that often move into philosophical realms; a feel for...

Violinist Rupert Marshall-Luck offers a program of English violin concertos—in this case, Charles Villier Stanford’s uncompleted Second Concerto, orchestrated by Jeremy Dibble from the composer’s piano...

Hänsel und Gretel the opera, recorded its 120th year anniversary in 2013, a milestone celebrated at least in part by this production from the German city...

The first three works listed above are early Janáček, but, even when we note their dates, it is difficult to comprehend just how early: Brahms was...

After showing up routinely on concert programs in the era between the world wars—it was even championed by Arturo Toscanini, who led a broadcast performance in...

Aram Khachaturian’s 1940 Violin Concerto is one of his best-known works, and one of his finest. This composer was at his best when he could draw...

This program consists of four short pieces for violin and piano, written in the 1920s when the composer was finding his distinctive Armenian voice, plus six...

John Kinsella is an Irish composer, born in 1932 and still alive as of this writing. From the perspective of length (37 minutes vs. 32 minutes)...

Joseph Martin Kraus (1756–1792) is not the “Swedish Mozart,” or Haydn, or Beethoven, but has his own voice which shares characteristics of these three. Born in...

Born in Lüneburg, in the Kingdom of Hanover, in 1786, and dying in Copenhagen at a young age of 46 in 1832, Friedrich Kuhlau’s world was...

This would appear to be a reissue of an earlier disc ( Fanfare 35:2), on which all 24 bicinia of 1577 were played on two dulcians,...

Paul Herrera’s and Kaori Toda’s readings on period instruments of the first book of Jean-Marie Leclair’s six sonatas for two violins emphasize, from the very first...

Wo die Lerche singt (Where the Lark Sings) is Franz Lehár’s 22nd operetta and the only one written originally in Hungarian and premiered in that country...

There are two reasons to consider this Glossa rerelease from 2000 essential for anybody interested in 16th-century chansons. The first is Claude Le Jeune, whose secular...

The joy of Immortal Performances is that it will never let you get away with a single performance of an opera. No, there are addenda, commercial...

Lazar Berman was one of the most consistent of 20th-century pianists—but, simultaneously, one of the most inconsistent. Certainly, his recordings return primarily to the same narrow...

James MacMillan (b. 1959) has established an international profile, and is easily the leading Scottish composer of his generation. He’s most noted for a series of...

Now that Mahler is the most popular symphonist on orchestral programs after Beethoven, we might as well acknowledge that his Ninth Symphony is our Ninth, a...

Brave, foolhardy even, to try and tackle the emotions and after-effects of 9/11 through chamber music, or indeed any sort of music. I was expecting the...

Kevin Malone is a Manchester-based American composer—Manchester in the north of England, that is, home of the Hallé, the Royal Northern College of Music, and unrealistic...

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