Issue 38:5
May/June 2015
Magazine Contents

Classical Recordings Pg. 5

Pristine has done it again with a treasurable release. Notable perhaps most obviously for Joan Sutherland’s assumption of the role of Queen of the Night, and...

Markus Becker, with more than 20 reviews of his playing in this publication, is certainly no stranger to Fanfare readers, but heretofore only a hint of...

I wasn’t sure there was much oxygen left in Pictures at an Exhibition after the breathtaking readings it has received from virtuosos on the order of...

As I mentioned in an earlier review of her music, composer Maria Newman writes some of the most interesting modern-day tonal music I have ever heard....

I have written positively in these pages previously on the music of Maria Newman, and this disc gives me no cause to change my opinions. The...

Let’s recapitulate once more concerning the so-called “basset clarinet.” Anton Stadler, for whom Mozart wrote his works for clarinet, possessed instruments in A and B♭ that...

I first heard a work of Andrew Norman (b. 1979) at Tanglewood a few years back. Drip Blip Sparkle Spin Glint Glide Glow Float Flop Chop...

Jos van Immerseel is an early music aficionado, so it is no surprise that he professes to offer a new interpretation of Carmina Burana with a...

Arvo Pärt’s Stabat Mater is an established work of genius by an acknowledged master and hardly needs an introduction here. It has had a number of...

This is the second set of two discs by Flemish harpsichordist Pieter-Jan Belder devoted to the musicologically-seminal Fitzwilliam Virginal Book . This manuscript of over 300...

In a review of an album of Piccinini’s music featuring Nigel North ( Fanfare 19:1), Elliott Hurwitt stated 20 years ago “It is a sign of...

This is a CD of delicious beauty. In a world of clangorous chamber music performances, sometimes so muscular one fears being in the presence of a...

Gabriel Pierné’s Piano Trio is a mature work, written in 1921 when the composer was 58. Like much of Pierné’s chamber music it is large in...

Poulenc’s Organ Concerto and Saint-Saëns’s “Organ” Symphony make for the perfect dysfunctional marriage on disc, one that has been consecrated many times before. They’re like the...

This live recording celebrating the launching of the refurbished Royal Festival Hall organ presents a natural coupling and has plenty of potential, with Yannick Nézet-Séguin providing...

The rising German cellist Leonard Elschenbroich made an appearance in the last issue ( Fanfare 38:4) as a member of the outstanding Sitkovetsky Piano Trio. Here...

Dmitri Kabalevsky’s Cello Concerto No. 2 is one of the Soviet composer’s most serious works; also one of the few to approach Shostakovich in depth and...

Ilya Yakushev studied at the St. Petersburg Conservatory and subsequently at Mannes College of Music in New York under Vladimir Feltsman. The winner of several competitions,...

Much as I enjoyed the first two installments of this cycle ( Fanfare 36:5 and 37:5), I had some apprehensions about this one. The earlier recordings...

Arturo Toscanini (1867–1957) conducted the world premieres of three Puccini operas: La bohème (1896), La fanciulla del West (1910), and Turandot (1926). Toscanini had many opportunities...

The Zubin Mehta/Joan Sutherland/ Luciano Pavarotti Turandot , Herbert von Karajan/Mirella Freni/Pavarotti La bohème , and this Madama Butterfly to a certain extent mark the end...

To generate the maximum cheers and tears, Tosca requires three great verismo singers, but at present two would seem lavish, and on most nights one will...

Decca’s 1955 recording of Turandot featuring Inge Borkh, Mario Del Monaco, and Renata Tebaldi basically introduced the opera for the first time to many music lovers...

The figure of Vladimir Ashkenazy looms large in Decca’s complete Rachmaninoff—but not as large as it might have. Of the 45 works with opus numbers, Ashkenazy...

I was sufficiently impressed by Carl A. Bünte’s recording of the Symphonie fantastique to want to review this disc. I was not disappointed. Bünte, one of...

Carl August Bünte was the chief conductor of the Berliner Symphonisches Orchester, the third orchestra of West Berlin, for 24 years beginning in 1949; thereafter he...

This appears to be a CD-R reissue of a 1995 release from Appian Publications and Recordings in England. The transfers are by Bryan Crimp. I looked...

I am always eager to experience a new approach to this, Rachmaninoff’s problem symphony. Filled with excitement and ardor, it is also prone at times to...

Critics used to be more bare-knuckle than they are today. When Keats died of tuberculosis at the tragic age of 25, Byron commented maliciously that he...

Dmitri Kitaenko’s cycle of Tchaikovsky symphonies is one of the best-kept secrets in the catalog. Kitaenko’s performances are near the top of the list if you...

Not long ago, in Fanfare 38:3, I reviewed a Glyndebourne production of this opera, staged by Jonathan Kent. I found the Glyndebourne staging, which set the...

Pièces de clavecin en concerts , Rameau’s only composition for chamber ensemble, is scored for harpsichord, flute or violin, and viola da gamba or a second...

Before listening to the American premiere of Alexander Raskatov’s Piano Concerto, I consulted the program note wondering about the title “Night Butterflies.” It relates to an...

Champagne or beer? For the longest time the choice, when it came to Ravel on disc, was automatic. French conductors have dominated the field, and to...

While searching for superlatives to describe these performances, it occurred to me that what distinguishes the Trio Solisti is the opposite of what their name implies....

Violinist Maria Bachmann, cellist Alexis Pia Gerlach, and pianist Adam Neiman, the soloists of “trio of soloists”—to translate the ensemble’s name—are exuberant, dynamic, technically impeccable, passionate,...

Violinist Emy Bernecoli and pianist Massimo Giuseppe Bianchi join Respighi’s Violin Sonata in B Minor in their second volume of the composer’s complete music for violin...

Woody Allen’s Midnight in Paris is a fetching comedy whose American writer-hero, delighted with Paris, discovers a taxi cab that will take him at midnight back...

One of music’s intriguing vectors of influence has always run from Beethoven through Schumann to Elgar. Encounter Hubert Parry along this timeline, and you hear Elgar...

Kaija Saariaho’s music, as the notes tell us, is not meant to be abstract but rather passionate and almost tactile. She has written monodramas for the...

Les Barbares (The Barbarians), the 10th of Saint-Saëns’s 13 operas, composed in 1900–01 and premiered in the latter year, receives here its premiere recording, and is...

There’s always room for new recordings of these works when they’re good ones; and in the case of this release two of the numbers are. The...

Violinist Mauro Tortorelli and pianist Angela Meluso give the first movement of Saint-Saëns’s First Violin Sonata a loamy, ardent reading. Jascha Heifetz seemed taut by comparison,...

One of the dreariest things in reviewing is to encounter a failed sonic blockbuster. I think that is what we have here. The Saint-Saëns “Organ” Symphony,...

Here’s a salute to one of the great Cavaillé-Coll organs, originally built for the Paris Expo in 1878, restored and moved various times, finally ending up...

These crisply scintillating performances wing their way through the Saint-Saëns and d’Indy with insinuating lilt. For instance, where other readings of the Saint-Saëns (e.g., the Rembrandt...

The Horzowski Trio—Jesse Mills, violin, Raman Ramakrishman, cello, and Rieko Aizawa, piano—is named for legendary pianist Mieczysław Horszowski, whose 50 years at the Curtis Institute resulted...

Aside from a brief flurry of interest 15 years ago on the currently moribund ASV label, Giovanni Felice Sances (1600–1679) has been generally forgotten. In his...

Satie’s tempo markings for his Gymnopédies are Lent et douloureux, Lent et triste , and Lent et grave , respectively. But just how slowly should they...

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Be Missed!