Issue 37:5
May/June 2014
Magazine Contents

Classical Recordings

If a PR agent had been consulted for a title of this release, they might well have chosen The Lighter Side of Biber , winceable though...

Johann Caspar Kerll (1627–1693), one of the two Catholic composers of 17th-century German lands whose works are coupled on this disc, was born to Bohemian Lutheran...

Kazuki Yamada is a young Japanese conductor. He has been principal guest conductor of the Suisse Romande Orchestra since 2010. He possesses taste and technique. Here...

If numbers of recordings were a reliable measure of the popularity of certain musical works, one would have to surmise that Bizet’s incidental music to

Sydney Australia has a perfectly fine opera house—in fact, it is architecturally one of the most beautiful in the world. One would think that Opera Australia...

This production mixes the authentic with the experimental, generally with excellent results. Authenticity can be found in the six footlight boxes at the front of the...

This release falls into the category of “Who’d Have Thunk It.” Though I’d come across his name before, my first actual encounter with the music of...

Having only just reviewed a disappointing set of the Brahms piano concertos with Hélène Grimaud and Andris Nelsons for the last issue, I was very optimistic...

Peter Korfmacher’s succinct, thought-provoking notes relate that Leonidas Kavakos and Riccardo Chailly, hoping to avoid bloat, have gone back to tempos for Brahms’s Violin Concerto found...

A few short years ago new releases of Brahms’s two cello sonatas were arriving with such frequency—at least one per issue—that I literally begged cellists and...

Stokowski must have admired this Symphony quite a bit, for he made five official recordings of it: in 1927 and 1936 with the Philadelphia Orchestra, in...

Todd Crow has something in common with a couple of other American pianists, Richard Goode and Jerome Rose. All three have enjoyed long and distinguished careers,...

Do you program a disc to showcase your wares across a range of repertoire, as one might on the concert stage, or do you allow collectors...

Frank Bridge’s large and fascinating Piano Sonata was written over a three-year span from 1921 to 1924, yet unlike some of his pricklier later works, this...

The concept behind Richard Jones’s stage production of Gloriana is this: The newly crowned Queen Elizabeth II is attending a (presumed) rehearsal of this opera, which...

Gloriana was a disappointment at its premiere in 1953, and has never caught on since then. Most of its problems can be laid at the feet...

This new recording of Britten’s three quartets and three Divetimenti is splendidly played by the Endellion Quartet. The earliest of the works, the Divertimenti, are good...

This latest release by Zuill Bailey finds the cellist in excellent form playing the Britten Cello Symphony and Cello Sonata. His famed singing tone is now...

These two pieces, from 1964 and 1961 respectively, have now taken their place as part of the core cello repertory, and they have not wanted for...

For me, the Britten centenary brought a bumper crop of two of his operas, Billy Budd and The Turn of the Screw . And yet, I...

I had the pleasure of hearing Camerata Nordica at a Prom Concert in London last year. Under their violinist/conductor Tønnesen, the young group played a selection...

Well, now! Here is the kind of recording one lives to hear, with brisk, energetic, and beautifully recorded readings of some of Britten’s early orchestral works....

Last year’s centenary celebration was a boon for admirers of the music of Benjamin Britten. There were a flood of anniversary editions, including the omnibus set...

There has been a profusion of War Requiem s lately, presumably in honor of the composer’s centennial. I’ve reviewed one in each of the last two...

While Solti made CD recordings of both of these works with the Chicago Symphony for Decca (in 1992 and 1993 respectively), they are most welcome here...

I’m irresistibly tempted to say the porridge here is just right, except for the fact that when you deal with Bruckner, there are far more than...

If you had turned on an FM radio in New York City in 1960, perhaps a big Blaupunkt console with a green illuminated dial, as I...

Last year I had occasion to review and recommend for purchase another disc of three orchestral works by Alan Bush (1900–1995), performed by the same conductor...

Taken with Holger Groschopp’s four-CD collection of Busoni’s transcriptions (Capriccio 7015, Fanfare 33:4), Hamelin’s is the only notable tilt at Busoni’s piano music since Geoffrey Douglas...

In the early 1950s, John Cage undertook what he envisioned as a deliberately endless cycle of works, using his newly developed techniques of chance procedures and...

Not to be confused with Music for Piano (1952–56) or Music of Changes (1951), both early, extended works for solo piano, Solo for Piano is the...

The Alfredo Casella Project (unofficially named, of course) continues apace at Naxos with this superb release of his Concerto for Strings, receiving here its world premiere...

Alfredo Catalani, the short-lived composer of one of the most famous soprano arias in the world (“Ebben? Ne andrò lontana” from his opera La Wally

Due to his premature death at age 39 from tuberculosis, Alfredo Catalani (1854–1893) is one of the tragic near misses for musical immortality. In his finals...

This was a fascinating discovery. Georges Catoire (1861–1926) was born in Russia and lived there most of his life, his family having emigrated there from the...

This is a very enjoyable recital of nearly all of the solo piano music by the Scottish composer Ronald Center, who died in 1973. As far...

This is an interesting, if somewhat unfocused, collection of music by Marc-Antoine Charpentier. It’s made up of a multi-movement piece intended to accompany the sacrament of...

Cherubini is so familiar to us as a composer of operas (and, lest we forget, a superb Requiem—the C-Minor—that Toscanini must be given credit for reviving...

You, reader, will be seeing this, at the earliest, in the spring of 2014. I am listening to this new CD of Christmas carols by popular...

Nick van Bloss is an excellent Chopin pianist. The first thing you recognize about his Chopin playing is his sound. He has a big, rounded tone,...

Last year I was fortunate enough to watch a performance of John Corigliano’s 2007 Concerto for Percussion and Strings (with optional brass), a work he has...

In Fanfare 36:2 I reviewed Gheorge Constinescu’s (b. 1934) Pantomime on a Ravello DVD, and found this choreographed chamber orchestra piece to be stunning. So based...

A DVD of Gheoghe Costinescu’s music made Robert Carl’s Want List in 2012 and, listening to this disc of piano music, it is easy to hear...

I’ve been trying to get a handle on something: The current population of the world is just over 7 billion. OK, what percentage of those people...

At the risk of being pilloried, I shall remark that no one does early 18th-century character pieces on the harpsichord better than François Couperin. His four...

I missed this the first time it came around ( Fanfare 15:6) and I don’t have most of the more recent issues of the famous Three...

There’s an embarrassment of riches where Couperin’s Leçons de Ténèbres are concerned. My current favorite is Christie/Les Arts Florissants (Erato 017067), with Patricia Petibon and Sophie...

Available at CD Baby and ArkivMusic or as a download at Amazon.com This disc, titled The Impressionists, is the debut recording of pianist Towse-Beck, whose teachers...