Issue 39:1
Sept/Oct 2015
Magazine Contents

Classical Recordings Pg. 4

In many ways The Dream of Gerontius stands for an entire cultural era as much as Bach’s Passions do. Despite its suspicious Roman Catholic text, which...

Peter J. Rabinowitz reviewed a previous live performance by Colin Davis, from 2005 with the London Symphony, back in 30:3. I find myself entirely in agreement...

Catharinus Elling was a Norwegian composer whose dates (1858–1942) are slightly later than his famous compatriot Edvard Grieg. Paul Orgel reviewed a disc of his chamber...

Every so often a release (in this case a 1993 re-release from Marco Polo) comes along which serves to remind listeners that a particular national repertory...

I will refrain from giving much background information on the excellent Romanian-born cellist Laura Buruiana, since she was the subject of a feature article in

The second volume of Naxos’s series devoted to the violin music of George Enescu opens with the composer’s First Violin Sonata, a youthful work in three...

I’ve previously reviewed two recordings in this series devoted to Enescu’s symphonies: the Symphony No. 2 and Chamber Symphony No. 2 for 12 Instruments (Ondine 1196-2),...

I must begin this review by chastising CPO, a label I’ve had only praise for in the past, for making one of the worst messes I’ve...

Thierry Escaich’s Claude is based on Victor Hugo’s Claude Gueux , which in turn came from a real case. Escaich and librettist Robert Badinter have expanded...

This is the third in Toccata’s welcome series of (mostly) orchestral works by the 20th-entury Hungarian composer Ferenc Farkas (1905–2000). The first volume was reviewed in...

Forgive the twice-told tale. When these performances surfaced on Resonance a decade ago, I noted, “With impeccable ensemble, the Schubert slides slickly, propulsively over surfaces. And...

This release is important, if for nothing else, because it is the premiere recording of Morton Feldman’s final piece. The composer always titled his late works...

The music of Elena Firsova deserves a wider audience, so this disc, the first to be devoted entirely to her chamber music, is welcome indeed. Firsova...

Although a new recording of Jean Françaix’s Two-Piano Concerto of 1960 in up-to-date sound is very welcome, I have a slight reservation about the performances on...

This recorded program (the title means “sweetest poison”) is not simply a sampling of all six books of madrigals that Don Carlo Gesualdo (1566–1613) published between...

A fastidious friend of the English writer Ford Maddox Ford once heard The Good Soldier praised as “the finest novel in the English language.” At which...

The avant-garde was an institution by the time Philip Glass arrived on the scene in the mid-1970s, with its own festivals, sponsors, and performance groups. He...

Fans of violin diva Anne-Sophie Mutter (it seems inadequate to call her simply a violinist) will recognize this as a reissue of a release from 1989....

The relatively brief adult life of Lady Diana, Princess of Wales, makes for a poignant contemporary story, one as fully compelling as that of Anna Nicole...

When Polish music and the Baroque Period are mentioned together it would be difficult for anyone to name a composer of Polish extraction active during this...

In 2012, I reviewed the first in a series of CPO recordings devoted to the orchestral music of Paul Graener (1872–1948). The second volume appears to...

Guillemain has slipped into a lost back-parlor of French High Baroque. He is mid-Rococo, so he exhibits all those twirls of ornamentation and proportion that we...

This disc of Handel’s Ariodante , sung in English, harkens back to an era when opera in the native tongue was the vogue and thought to...

Handel’s great three-part oratorio Joshua (1748) is one of four so-called “victory oratorios,” written to interpret a Hanoverian victory over Catholic Stuart rebels. As such, it...

Here is the final set of harpsichord suites, the first disc of which was reviewed back in 2012 (35:3) by Christopher Brodersen and the second from...

I asked to review this disc because I had heard some music—I forget what now—by Jonathan Harvey that I had liked. This nonsense isn’t it. This...

Since they retired in 1987, the LaSalle Quartet’s reputation hasn’t faded away. Their landmark recordings from the 1970s and 80s of Schoenberg, Berg, Webern, and Zemlinsky...

This “new arrangement of the oratorio version” of Haydn’s beloved work belongs on the shelf next to several of the most unusual presentations on disc. By...

Benjamin Britten wrote such a rich store of music for his partner Peter Pears that I think of all British lyric tenors as “Britten tenors.” Some...

This is not the only time that Haydn’s first and last symphonies have been paired in concert or on discs. It’s an intriguing match, not only...

We don’t hear much of Michael Haydn (1737–1806) these days. The word “eclipsed” doesn’t begin to describe the degree to which he has been overshadowed by...

When Hans Werner Henze abandoned his native Germany and moved to Italy in 1953, he supposedly abandoned German music as well and began to write in...

This release has the distinction of being supported by two significant composers’ trusts, the RVW Trust and the John Ireland Trust, as well as by the...

Honegger’s wonderful opera-oratorio is compressed here from its usual 83 or 85 minutes to just 75. This makes the performance tauter but, to my ears, not...

On two previous occasions, in 36:2 (a reissue of a fine historic recording led by Eugene Ormandy) and 37:3 (a recent and very disappointing effort conducted...

Less than a year ago I wrote, upon reviewing the Camerata Köln in Hotteterre’s First Book of Suites ( Fanfare 37:6), “This album is labeled volume...

Here is the promised Volume 2 of the Gould Piano Trio’s traversal of Johann Nepomuk Hummel’s seven numbered piano trios. My review of Volume 1 in...

Actress-dancer Ida Rubinstein commissioned a ballet from Ibert in 1933. That work, Diane de Poitiers , proved a success, and she subsequently issued another commission to...

The string quartet has always been an intimate medium, one for expressing a composer’s most personal, most concentrated ideas. How surprising to hear instead a casual...

Album note author Mervyn Cook swiftly dispels the popular notion many hold of Charles Ives as the iconoclast of American composers; and by extension, I think,...

At first, I thought this was a reissue of recordings that might have been originally released on two separate CDs, but that doesn’t appear to be...

Produced, engineered, and edited for Chandos by Jonathan Cooper in September 2014, this CD contains intense, persuasive recorded performances of three masterpieces from the Czech chamber...

Keith Jarrett celebrated his 70th birthday on May 8, 2015, and Creation is one of the two discs released by ECM in honor of that event....

With this disc, the Phaedra series In Flanders’ Fields , devoted to the music of Belgian composers, reaches release number 85—an impressive record of dedication indeed...

Ukrainian-born composer Vladimir Jurowski (1915–1972) was the father of the conductor of this CD and the grandfather of the much more famous conductor who bears the...

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