Issue 38:4
Mar/Apr 2015
Magazine Contents

Classical Recordings Pg. 3

Now here is a special disc. The name Anna Fedorova is new to me, and from the photo on the cover of this beautifully produced disc,...

Now just reaching her mid-20s, Ukrainian pianist Anna Fedorova shows herself, on this debut recital, to be a significant pianistic talent. What’s most immediately striking about...

It’s a rare treat these days to come across any music by the Slovak composer Ján Cikker (1911–1989). Back in the 1980s I picked up several...

Marius Constant, when he wasn’t known for writing the Twilight Zone theme song, was mostly known as a ballet conductor for Roland Petit in Paris and...

Four concertos by Marius Constant, recorded back in 1990, show him as highly eclectic. His Modernist, tonally sophisticated language incorporates diverse influences, including modern jazz, classical...

Having received this Divine Art CD as the fifth disc I’ve encountered devoted to the organ music of my Fanfare colleague Carson Cooman, I am beginning...

Recorded in Edinburgh in 1999 and reissued now as part of the label’s Echo series, this spectacularly sung Linn collection confirms that the Dunedin Consort was...

There can be no doubt that François Couperin was interested in as broad a sweep of his published music as possible. Of course, he planned for...

Towards the end of his life, François Couperin (1668–1733) had achieved renown as probably the model against which all keyboard music in France was to be...

This fascinating recording includes the world premiere recording of the original version of Girolomo Crescentini’s 12 Ariettas, as well as Six Ariettas plus two waltzes by...

This disc, titled Modern Times, features five works written by Luigi Dallapiccola between 1930 and 1962, thus covering the bulk of his active career as a...

These are twin discs, part of a Capriccio series labeled Modern Times . I would point out that Luigi Dallapiccola was born 111 years ago and...

While examples of pianists, violinists, and (especially) cellists who gave up whatever they were doing to become conductors are legion, oboists-turned-conductor are understandably rare. Who, for...

Is there anything more satisfying than spending an afternoon with the piano music of Debussy? One thing is certain, and that is when the Frenchman’s often...

These are nice, well-thought-out, and atmospheric performances of Debussy’s orchestral masterpieces. Shui creates real magic in the beginning of “Gigues,” the first of the Images,

If the essence of La mer is to represent the seamless rise and fall of the sea, spiced with sounds of wind and birds, then this...

This disc is the third volume in pianist Malcolm Martineau’s project of recording Debussy’s complete songs. It contains 26 songs, some of which are among Debussy’s...

Next to nothing is known about Demachy (or de Machy, or Machy) at this time, not even his baptismal name. We do know that he studied...

Alphons Diepenbrock (1862–1921) was a classical scholar who became the leading Dutch composer in the opening decades of the 20th century. His reputation remained local because...

Charles François Dieupart is one of those French Baroque composers from the age of Couperin, Lully, and Marais who during his lifetime found little solace at...

Life isn’t fair. Some composers get all the attention from radio broadcasters, performers, and record companies, and others, no less worthwhile, seem to get the scraps....

Planned while Lucia di Lammermoor was about to be staged, Belisario is vintage Donizetti and an initial success at its 1836 premiere in Venice. That it...

There are now at least a staggering 176 recorded versions of the pot-boiler Lucia di Lammermoor, adapted from the historical novel The Bride of Lammermoor

Jonathan Dove (b. 1959) has made a name for himself as one of Great Britain’s leading composers of music for voice. We have here an arresting...

For a work virtually nobody in this country has ever heard live, the Dukas Symphony in C is doing pretty darn well. I count 11 different...

From the back cover blurb of this CD: “For this recording, manuscript sources for the three works were consulted, including the hitherto private proofs of the...

Once upon a time, an intellectual was defined as one who could hear Rossini’s William Tell Overture and not think of the Lone Ranger. That definition...

All due praise to Hyperion for its retrospective series, spanning many volumes, on the Romantic Piano and the Romantic Violin . These could have been little...

Who knew? Jan Ludislav Dussek (1760–1812), that pillar of Classical-era protocol, was a fugitive from the law. Evidently the music publishing business he founded in London...

When tart British reviewers say that a performance can be “quickly dispatched,” it has the ring of a merciful demise rather than a critical opinion. I...

I got to review Serebrier’s Bournemouth Dvořák Ninth in 35:4, a reading I thought well executed but not terribly stirring. Perhaps that’s why the conductor’s Dvořák...

This is Serebrier’s fifth Dvořák symphony disc with the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra. Only three symphonies (Nos. 1, 4, and 5) are missing now, and I think...

Except for the sensationally fine recordings that each has made of their old boss’s glorious/notorious (take your pick) Bach transcriptions and—perhaps—in their restlessly adventurous approach to...

Dvořák’s Requiem is a giant, complex work. In an ideal performance, it all comes together into a magnificent whole, a deeply moving, beautiful experience. With anything...

Every time I hear or see a new production of Rusalka I am again reminded of what a powerful, hauntingly beautiful score Antonín Dvořák wrote for...

I’m gratified to encounter this fine new Dvořák CD. Marcus Bosch is a galvanic conductor, who has dared successfully to tackle Bruckner and Verdi with the...

The second shoe has indeed dropped. Following the reissue two months ago of Païta’s recording of the Dvořák Seventh Symphony (Lodia 782), we now get the...

My previous encounters with recordings from the annual chamber music festival in Heimbach, Germany have conditioned me to expect excellent results from this source. One of...

Say what you will about “death music.” It had better live! This rewarding new performance of The Dream of Gerontius by Andrew Davis, beautifully annotated, is...

This is as niche as they come, especially to the average American listener, I would imagine. Trained in Liverpool and Manchester, David Ellis’s career remained remarkably...

Through lengthy liner copy by one Stefan Grondelaers, Niquet is quoted often, in pontifical mode, but evinces little interpretive insight as the music rolls. One hesitates...

Let’s leave aside the controversial and ultimately insufficient notion of Spectral music for the purposes of this review, despite the disc’s title, VOIX VOILÉES (Veiled Voices):...

I’ve been reviewing Cold Blue Music releases here and elsewhere ever since the label started issuing CDs, and so composer Michael Jon Fink is no stranger...

You’ll never lose a farthing betting that no one can guess what the works on this program by the estimable French violinist Renaud Capuçon have in...

Elsewhere in this issue, I review another new recording of Strauss’s Violin Sonata, performed by Thomas Albertus. That Gramola CD coupled the sonata with Strauss’s Violin...

When it comes to keyboard music of the 17th century, two names generally spring to mind: Girolamo Frescobaldi and his student Johann Jacob Froberger (1616–1667). The...

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