Issue 38:3
Jan/Feb 2015
Magazine Contents

Classical Recordings Pg. 6

For those who may be only vaguely familiar, or not at all, with the famous 19th-century Italian virtuoso cellist Carlo Alfredo Piatti (1822–1901), it may not...

Carlo Alfredo Piatti (1822–1901) originally began to study violin with his father, but soon switched to cello and lessons from his great uncle, renowned cellist Gaetano...

John Pickard is exactly the kind of modern composer I most admire: His music is not only well written from a technical aspect, but it is...

John Pickard’s “Gaia” Symphony is an astonishing work. The challenge of composing a 65-minute continuous composition for an ensemble comprised only of brass and percussion instruments...

Here is an enterprising program of what would seem disparate composers, with the instrumentation of bassoon, oboe, and piano being the only common theme. Played by...

To answer the obvious question, Gabriel Prokofiev is Sergei Prokofiev’s grandson, born in London in 1975. He takes after his grandfather in the sense that he...

A short distance into the concerto, it becomes evident that this is a performance characterized by extreme contrasts. The Andante introduction of the first movement, slow...

The notes to this 2013 CD tell us that it was one of the first original recordings made by the venerable Melodiya label in the past...

This is a welcome rerelease of recordings originally made in 1975 (Prokofiev’s Eighth Piano Sonata) and 1978 (Prokofiev’s Second Piano Sonata, Romeo and Juliet , and...

Gennady Rozhdestvensky played and recorded the Prokofiev symphonies again and again; the limited discographic details here and on other releases makes it difficult to sort them...

Sergei Rachmaninoff’s Symphonic Dances were written for the Philadelphia Orchestra. If this score needs anything, it’s a virtuoso orchestra, and Hungary’s Miskolc Symphony Orchestra isn’t one....

Hippolyte et Aricie was the first of Jean-Philippe Rameau’s long series of stage works, premiered in 1733, when he was already 50 years old. It was...

Jean-Philippe Rameau’s Pièces de clavecin en concerts stem from 1741 as pretty much the final instrumental chamber work that the composer published (an isolated work entitled...

At first glance this is an album of Ravel’s greatest hits for piano, but it was born from special dedication by the accomplished French pianist Vincent...

Florian Uhlig’s new Ravel set is advertised as the composer’s “Complete Piano Music,” as were Steven Osborne’s Hyperion set before it (reviewed by me in 35:1),...

This is unusually strong-minded Ravel, interpreted by Florian Uhlig, age 40, whose artist’s bio alerts us that he prizes a streak of unconventionality. Born in Düsseldorf,...

In Fanfare 37:2 I reviewed a disc of French piano concertos, played by the young German pianist Florian Uhlig. I was enthusiastic about it, especially his...

This is a fairly shocking album, to put it mildly. Bielefeld is a smallish city in Westphalia (larger than Corpus Christi, Texas, but smaller than Aurora,...

Cellist Yehuda Hanani once told me that every composer who ever writes a solo cello sonata or suite owes a huge debt to Bach. This disc...

This is the second of four discs in the Kreutzer Quartet’s exploration of the quartets that Anton Reicha (1770–1836) composed in Vienna between 1802 and 1805....

The lead article in the booklet bears the title Webern and his Successors . Although born nearly a century after Webern (1883), Gerald Resch (1975) fits....

This disc fills in a gap in recordings of cello concerto literature composed between Beethoven’s Triple Concerto (1812), and the Schumann Concerto (1850), as the cello...

This Scheherazde is for those occasions when you’re tired of debating with friends the merits of Reiner, Beecham, Bernstein, Stokowski, and other more or less standard...

This release offers transcriptions for four-hand piano duet of three orchestral works by Rimsky-Korsakov. Two of these arrangements are by Rimsky himself, and the third (of...

Prior to being eclipsed by the spectacular rise of Charles Dutoit’s Montreal Symphony—called with much justification the finest French orchestra since Serge Koussevitzky’s Boston Symphony—the Toronto...

Returning to Scheherazade , you can’t help wondering why Rimsky-Korsakov never wrote anything as good for the orchestra again. Having evoked with a marvelous palette the...

You can probably guess how this review is going to begin and end. For a major label like Chandos to put out a new top-of-the-line, full-priced...

Music is about emotions, so we tend to forget that composers are also thinkers. The contemporary American composer Robert Xavier Rodriguez has poured a wealth of...

Texan composer Robert Xavier Rodríguez writes in a pleasantly eclectic manner. This can result in some interesting juxtapositions. Rodríguez is a modern tonal composer, but some...

It wasn’t too terribly long ago, in a review of string trios by Ernst Naumann and Wilhelm Berger in issue 35:3, that I found myself musing...

Since about 1980 the Rossini Opera Festival has been held annually in Pesaro. That small Italian town on the Adriatic seacoast, the composer’s birthplace, is host...

I am not aware of any other video recording of Rossini’s Otello , and quite frankly there is no need for one. Vocally this is a...

As the only symphony of Bruckner’s pupil Hans Rott has now reached the significant milestone of a 10th commercial recording, perhaps it’s time to soft-pedal the...

In Fanfare 31:5, I reviewed a Naxos recording (8.570190) by violinist Philippe Quint and pianist William Wolfram of Miklós Rózsa’s works for violin or for violin...

The Rudolph of the above headnote is Archduke Rudolph of Austria (1788–1831), best known as a patron and student of Beethoven and dedicatee of the latter’s...

This wonderful and fascinating disc presents three extended works by Frederic Rzewski played by Ralph van Raat, the Dutch pianist who is one of the composer’s...

This is a useful release for those who don’t want to spring for Nonesuch’s multi-disc Rzewski plays Rzewski collection from 2005, which is out of print...

By the time you read this, it will have been almost a year since I interviewed Susan Merdinger for the March-April, 2014 (37:4) issue of the...

In order to fit on one CD, recordings of Saint-Saëns’s works for cello and orchestra make the choice of including—along with the two concertos and two...

Saint-Saëns’s two most popular piano concertos are played terrifically here by a pianist previously unknown to me, Muza Rubackytė, born in Lithuania and trained in Moscow...

This is a truly peculiar release. The main recording is a CD of the two pieces of music. But Sheva thought there was value in adding...

Except for those of Rodrigo, Castelnuovo-Tedesco, Villa-Lobos, Malcolm Arnold, and Elmer Bernstein, first-rate listener-friendly modern guitar concertos are hardly a glut on the market. So here...

In February of 1697 Alessandro Scarlatti premiered his latest opera at the Teatro San Bartolomeo in Naples, noting that this work set in ancient Egypt began...

This recital of Scarlatti keyboard sonatas is charming and full of spark. Igor Kamenz approaches Scarlatti with just the right kind of articulation: crisp, slightly detached,...

As the middle child of the string section, the viola doesn’t get enough respect and is assailed with belittling jokes. (“Have you heard the one about...

“Transcribing” 19th-century string quartets, especially in the early 20th century, was not an uncommon practice. I put the word “transcribing” in quotes because I’ve long struggled...

Artur Schnabel remains an inspiration for anyone who believes in his philosophy of performance, which simply stated is “play the music first, the piano second.” When...

Who is Christophe Vautier? He has no web site I could find; he has no other recordings listed besides this one on Amazon; and the very...

Not To
Be Missed!