Issue 37:6
July/Aug 2014
Magazine Contents

Classical Recordings Pg. 4

Louis-Gabriel Guillemain (1705–1770), whose Amusement receives its first recording in Gilles Collard’s performance of 30 of its movements, studied the violin with Giovanni Battista Somis and...

I wanted to review this DVD because of my great admiration for Gulda’s musical curiosity, his embracing of jazz, and his quest to break down musical...

It should be stated at the outset that Handel wrote no work entitled Ciel e terra . It would seem that the idea of “heaven and...

This CD pairs the complete surviving organ works of two lesser-known 17th-century German composers from Lübeck during the period of Dieterich Buxtehude. Of Nicolaus Hasse (c....

Ketil Christensen is a good trumpeter whose tone is much more pleasant to the ear than Maurice André’s peashooter timbre. He has good technique, although he...

This production brims with contradictions, twists, and surprises. The booklet is not very forthcoming; this geography buff had to rely on the Internet to locate the...

These highly unorthodox readings of Haydn quartets, including as a bonus disc his op. 51 ( Seven Last Words of Our Savior ), represent to my...

The booklet tells us that Matthieu Dupouy “has devoted himself to the harpsichord, clavichord and fortepiano,” but his instrument is identified as “Pianoforte Jakob Weimes of...

Those readers who prefer uniformity in their recorded cycles of a composer’s works will not be pleased by this latest release, labeled Volume 4, in Naxos’s...

I’ve been reviewing Joseph Haydn’s music for so many decades that I feel like part of the family, but this is my formal introduction to Uncle...

The Kansas City Symphony Orchestra and Reference Recordings have set very high standards with their previous recordings of music by Britten, Elgar, and Sibelius/Sullivan. This collection...

Butcher, baker, candlestick maker? Well, not exactly, but it wouldn’t be off the mark to call E. T. A. Hoffmann (1776–1822) a polymath, for he was...

So few people have heard E. T. A. Hoffmann’s music (and this even includes those who know that he even was a composer) that to actually...

First things first: The wide separation between the catalog numbers of these two CDs is evidence that they were not recorded at the same time, and...

In his day, Anthony Holborne (c. 1545–1602) was a highly respected composer and instrumentalist. His patrons included Robert Cecil, the first Earl of Salisbury; Mary Sidney,...

With three exceptions—a 1980 recording of organ works issued by Arion, a 1985 CD of motets released by MDG (reviewed by J. F. Weber in 8:6),...

Jacques-Martin Hotteterre (1674–1763) possessed talent, taste, showmanship, and a shrewd business sense. Few musicians have been so synergistic in their accomplishments. As a performer, he attracted...

It is an understatement to say that, outside Great Britain, the choir of King’s College, Cambridge, is probably the best-known British—better, quintessentially English—choral institution. Though the...

If I’d realized in advance that these were period instrument performances I wouldn’t have requested this release for review, for as stated on numerous past occasions,...

Two Czech opera composers placed together with their autobiographical string quartets is at first glance a logical idea, although few labels seem to have had the...

This disc, entitled The Red Book, is not a classical CD. This is minimalist pop music with whole notes held by the strings. Group leader and...

First, some general remarks. Right after a disc reviewed in Fanfare 37:5, this is the fifth issue in Maurice Bourbon’s series of Josquin Masses, all five...

A year-and-a-half ago, in issue 36:3, I reviewed the earlier companion to this release, CPO’s two-disc set of Kabalevsky’s complete works for piano and orchestra. In...

Argentine-born Mauricio Kagel (1931–2008) became a leader of the European avant-garde in the 1960s and 70s, a thoroughly anti-establishment figure on fronts musical, dramatic, and political....

In my review of Peter Eötvös’s Love and Other Demons ( Fanfare 37:5), I said that, although I liked a great deal of what he accomplished,...

Azerbaijani composer Kara Karayev (1918–1982) quickly became one of Shostakovich’s favored students when he turned up to study at the Moscow Conservatory in 1938 at the...

Whereas some critics apologize for having to review anything by Aram Khachaturian (1903–1978), I have been a lifelong fan, ever since I discovered his Second Symphony...

Zoltán Kodály didn’t write much piano music; there are a few other minor sets. Most familiar are the Marosszék Dances , written in 1927 but outshone...

This is a stimulating and attractive CD of works for flute and clarinet by Charles Koechlin, also including a rare Sonata for the two wind instruments...

The Aron Quartet was formed in 1998 by a group of Viennese musicians, but thus far hasn’t racked up an extensive discography. A previous release on...

Max Kowalski (1882–1956), who ran a solicitor’s office in Frankfurt am Main, always considered himself a “part-time Lieder composer,” yet managed to write over 250 songs....

Johann Ludwig Krebs (1713–1780) is no stranger to music history, though he was one of those students who was completely overshadowed both by his teacher, Johann...

Fernand de La Tombelle (1854–1928) is a virtually forgotten figure today, so much so that the current recording contains two world premieres—both the piano trio and...

Quatour Béla has named its disc of Ligeti’s string quartets after the First, “Métamorphoses nocturnes.” That may seem a strange choice, given that the Second is...

These works for violin and piano span a large portion of Fernando Lopes-Graça’s career; the sonatinas date from 1931 and the Adágio dolorosa e Fantasia

Having enjoyed a previous Naxos release of two piano concertos by the long-lived Portuguese composer Fernando Lopes-Graça (1906-1994), I was interested to hear this disc, which...

The musical activities of Portuguese composer, conductor, and musicologist Fernando Lopes-Graça (1906–1994) were sometimes curtailed because of his political activity. A member of the Communist Party,...

If Lyapunov is remembered at all by modern listeners of classical music, it’s as the composer of a series of Transcendental Etudes . (Thankfully, Louis Kentner’s...

Three of the 20th century’s loveliest symphonies were composed by Leevi Madetoja (1887–1947), a Finnish composer who as a young man studied with and later befriended...

There is certainly sufficient justification for making a well-thought-through arrangement of Mahler’s “Resurrection” Symphony for small orchestra. The original is beyond the resources of small community...

Zubin Mehta made three great recordings with the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra between 1965 and 1975, including this one, Bruckner’s Ninth Symphony, and Franz Schmidt’s Fourth Symphony....

This strange set spreads the “Resurrection” Symphony, which runs 90 minutes, over the first two CDs. It then gives you a third disc in which Zander...

Georg Solti’s Decca recording of Mahler’s Eighth Symphony has received nearly universal critical acclaim, both for Solti’s performance and its sound. The “Symphony of a Thousand”...

This is the first recording of Henry Mancini’s complete score for Breakfast at Tiffany’s. The incredible-sounding RCA Living Stereo “original soundtrack” release was actually a re-recording...

This is a re-release of an album recorded in 1993. It was made at a time when Jordi Savall was still concentrating on the Baroque repertoire...

Mario Marazzoli is a composer with whom I’ve only a passing acquaintance, mainly just as a passing reference. A contemporary of composers Luigi Rossi and Stefano...

I will confess to have been unfamiliar with José Marín (1619–1699), a Spanish composer who was apparently trained in Rome, where he became a priest. He...