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This book is about bands, in particular, American bands. Not brass bands, not marching bands, not student bands, but professional concert bands, often touring, numbering 40...

Born 1952 in Paris, Denis Levaillant began studying classical music before veering off to experiment with a variety of genres and electronic techniques. His versatile musicianship...


Recent Music Reviews

Kicking off with the G-Major Prelude from op. 32, and therefore setting forth a most reflective profile, Canadian pianist Yaroslav Senyshyn then confirms his script is...

Elsewhere in the current edition of Fanfare , I reviewed another disc by Capella Romana, which also included music by Robert Kyr. Here they are again,...

American violinist Daniel Stepner is first violinist of the Lydian String Quartet and artistic director of the Aston Magna Festival. He has also served as concertmaster...

Ray Tuttle interviewed Thomas Sleeper back in 2011 ( Fanfare 34:3), wondering at the outset if the prolific composer ever sleeps, as in addition to writing...


More Music Reviews

The music of Walter Saul is entertaining, stimulating, and uplifting. A glance at his web site (waltersaul.com), and for that matter his Facebook page, reveals his...

I have been an admirer of Danish recorder virtuoso Michala Petri’s artistry since I bought her first Philips LP of works by various Baroque composers in...

Every month, I make the acquaintance (via recordings) with one or more artists new to me. Some are pleasant to hear, some enticing, and some uninteresting,...

Nikolay Andreyevich Roslavets (1880–1944) is pretty much terra incognito to me. Granted, I’ve heard some of his music—a Teldec CD containing three of Roslavets’s piano trios...

This album was previously released in 1987 on the Who’s Who in Jazz label, then by the Jazz Hour label in 1992—and once again, as is...

A previous Fanfare interview (with Maria Nockin) already covered Steven Masi’s education and teachers. In it, Masi says, “Beethoven represents a meeting of opposites: the sacred...


This book is about bands, in particular, American bands. Not brass bands, not marching bands, not student bands, but professional concert bands, often touring, numbering 40...

Born 1952 in Paris, Denis Levaillant began studying classical music before veering off to experiment with a variety of genres and electronic techniques. His versatile musicianship...

This year, the Royal Opera House at Covent Garden has provided us with a video Tosca for the ages. With a dream cast of Angela Gheorghiu,...

In the 20-plus years that I have been contributing to this publication, I’ve noticed a huge sea change. When I started, Fanfare’s emphasis seemed to be...

I have been arguing with a friend of mine that great opera performances are not singer-driven, meaning that although I want to hear good voices that...

Pierrequin de Thérache (c.1470–1528) spent his career at the court of Lorraine in Nancy from 1492, serving from 1500 to 1527 as master of the choirboys....

Available at Amazon.com or at voice-talk.net This remarkable book, with an introduction by New York voice teacher Daniel James Shigo, makes available for general use and...

In this study, Barbara L. Kelly takes on what she sees as the current, and often incorrect, presentation of French music in the interwar period, a...

This album was previously released in 1987 on the Who’s Who in Jazz label, then by the Jazz Hour label in 1992—and once again, as is...

Whatever my caveats about West Wind’s jazz releases (see my review of The Art of the Saxophone elsewhere in this issue), there’s no question that this...